effect of U.S. Supreme Court ruling Sullivan v. Zebley on child SSI and AFDC enrollment
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effect of U.S. Supreme Court ruling Sullivan v. Zebley on child SSI and AFDC enrollment

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Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Children with disabilities -- United States -- Econometric models.,
  • Aid to families with dependent children programs -- United States -- Econometric models.,
  • Supplemental security income program -- United States -- Econometric models.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementA. Bowen Garrett, Sherry Glied.
SeriesNBER working paper series -- working paper 6125, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 6125.
ContributionsGlied, Sherry., National Bureau of Economic Research.
The Physical Object
Pagination37 p. :
Number of Pages37
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22405337M

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The Effect of U.S. Supreme Court Ruling Sullivan v. Zebley on Child SSI and AFDC Enrollment Article (PDF Available) September with Reads. Downloadable! In , in the case of Sullivan v. Zebley, the U.S. Supreme Court relaxed the criteria whereby children became eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Since that ruling, the number of children covered by SSI has almost tripled; nearly 1 million American children are receiving cash and medical benefits through SSI. Get this from a library! The Effect of U.S. Supreme Court Ruling Sullivan v. Zebley on Child SSI and AFDC Enrollment. [Sherry Glied; A Bowen Garrett; National Bureau of Economic Research;] -- In , in the case of Sullivan v. Zebley, the U.S. Supreme Court relaxed the criteria whereby children became eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. In , in the case of Sullivan v. Zebley, the U.S. Supreme Court relaxed the criteria whereby children became eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Since that ruling, the number of children covered by SSI has almost tripled; nearly 1 million American children are receiving cash and medical benefits through : A. Bowen Garrett and Sherry Glied.

Sullivan v. Zebley, U.S. (), was a landmark decision by the United States Supreme Court involving the determination of childhood Social Security Disability benefits. In the decision, the Supreme Court ruled that substantial parts of the Supplemental Security Income program's regulation on determining disability for children were inconsistent with the Social Security Act. The Effect of U.S. Supreme Court Ruling Sullivan v. Zebley.   The Effect of U.S. Supreme Court Ruling Sullivan V. Zebley on Child Ssi and Afdc Enrollment By A. Bowen Garrett and Sherry Glied. Levere () takes advantage of a second source of quasi-experimental variation in SSI coverage, in this case occasioned by the Sullivan v. Zebley Supreme Court decision, which broadened SSI coverage for children with mental disabilities.

Zebley expansion in child SSI enrollment to identify spillovers between the programs. We describe how a family's decision to participate in AFDC or SSI is likely to depend on the level of AFDC and. The Effect of U.S. Supreme Court Ruling Sullivan v. Zebley on Child SSI and AFDC Enrollment NBER Working Papers, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc View citations (2) Medicaid and Service Use Among Homeless Adults NBER Working Papers, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc ; Journal Articles Effects of ACA Medicaid. Much of the increase in child SSI participation was precipitated by the February Supreme Court decision in Sullivan v. Zebley, which had the effect of liberalizing the medical eligibility criteria for children to qualify for SSI. The growth in SSI receipt after the Zebley decision was driven primarily by an.   Changes in Child SSI Eligibility, â On Febru , the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Sullivan v. Zebley that the SSA was improperly determining the eligibility of children for SSI. Before , both adults and children were eligible for SSI .